Monday, September 1, 2008

More news

Our maximum wind speed at the courthouse is now clocked at 69 mph... Power lines are down in 26 locations around the parish at this time...

Luling / Hahnville has superficial damage only... trees down, powerlines, fences blown in. We did spot some roofs blown off but they were metal roofs on commercial buildings. One interesting sight was a lemon tree with every single piece of fruit blown down to the ground by the wind. Again, we have seen no major damage as of yet.

Willowdale / Willowridge is dry but there is still a possibility of storm surge flooding later tonight and into tomorrow.

-Renee

10 comments:

parallax said...

Just how bad of a risk is there os storm surge flooding in Willowdale? If there is storm surge flooding, how bad is it expected to be?

St. Charles Parish said...

Predictions right now call for 6-8 feet of storm surge in Des Allemands / Bayou Gauche and Willowridge.

Katie said...

any word on Montz?

dmarse said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
dmarse said...

Here's a link to the buoys in our area:
http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/maps/WestGulf_inset.shtml

The three that I've been looking at are as follows (in order from in the gulf, to around Barataria bay, to the third being in bayou gauche:

SW Pass

Grand Isle

Bayou Gauche

I think this is a more real indication of surge than the news can ever give us. Note how the one out of SW pass has peaked out at around 5.8ft (on the water level plot) and the grand isle is approached that and fallen. That water has yet to end up behind Bayou Gauche.

I'll leave it to the experts to say how the terrain/water channels will effect this volume of water coming in (how high/low it actually piles up).

I just see that trend of water going to around 5.6'±.2ish ft and then falling.

With the experts saying that surge will be around 6-8 ft I'm thinking that this peak in these water level plots is the surge that they're all talking about.

K said...

For curiosity's sake... Can anyone explain the mechanism behind why the storm surge will be coming in behind this particular storm / weather situation? I've heard it mentioned numerous times but no one has offered an explanation during the reports that I've heard. Just wondering ....

john55 said...

http://tidesonline.nos.noaa.gov/plotcomp.shtml?station_info=8762372+Bayou+LaBranch%2C+LA

The above link didn't post very well... but with a copy and paste should take you to the bouy data for Lake P. Located on the south shore of tha lake at the edge of LaBranch wetlands. Shows water level in lake coming up... at 3.6 ft at 1pm cdt.

dmarse said...

My opinion is that the water that we're seeing coming up behind the storm is the same effect seen if our area sees a sustained wind out of the south for a long period of time.

It's more of a measure of water pushed into the wetlands under STC by the wind + storm surge than just "storm surge."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storm_surge



Looking at that sort of tells me that "storm surge" is more of a loose term to describe the net effect of water piled up by wind, pressure surge, high tide, and any other reasons that water might be getting pushed in.


Below is the link that John posted:
Bayou LaBranche

dmarse said...

never mind. I messed it up too.

copy/paste it is.

Amber said...

how are the conditions in st.rose? around Dianne Place...